Baseball Field Dimensions

posted on December 30th 2007 by Troy Frazier

Baseball and Softball Field Dimensions

There are a number of sites with dimensions for baseball and softball fields. I would like to consolidate some of that information and clear up a few points of confusion. I’ve also included youth baseball dimensions which can be difficult to find.

The back of home plate is the starting point for our measurements. The back of the home plate points to the catcher and the backstop. Home plates are surrounded by a black rubber. Don’t include the black rubber in your measurements, measure from the white part of the plate to the back corner of first base. This is the corner of the base closest to the foul line and furthest from second base and home. The next measurement goes from the back corner of first base to the CENTER of second base. Now measure from this point to the back corner of third base, and then back to our original point on home plate. This square will have equal sides, and 90 degree angles. The line from the back of home plate to the center of second base can be calculated with the Pythagorean Theorem A^2+B^2=C^2. See table 1.





 

Table 1

Baseball

Baseline

Home to Second

Pro, College, High School

90 Feet

127 Feet 3 3/8 Inches

Pony

80 Feet

113 Feet 2 Inches

Bronco

70 Feet

99 Feet

Little League

60 Feet

84 Feet 10 1/4 Inches

Pinto

50 Feet

70 Feet 8 Inches

Softball



Adult slow-pitch

65 Feet

91 Feet 11 Inches

College, High School, Adult

60 Feet

84 Feet 10 Inches

Youth 10 and under

55 Feet

77 Feet 9 Inches



Standard bases are 15 inches by 15 inches. If you are trying to find a base peg (anchor), subtract 6 to 7 inches from the baseline number above. For example: the base anchor for first base on a high school field will be roughly 89 feet 6 inches from the back of home plate. A metal detector can be very helpful for finding base pegs since they are frequently installed incorrectly.

The pitching area is not in the center of the square formed by the bases. Do not use the front of the rubber as a reference point between first and third base. The skinned infield (dirt part of the field) is measured as a radius from the front of the pitching rubber.

Table 2

Baseball

Home to front of rubber

Radius of skinned infield

Pro, College, High School

60 Feet 6 Inches

95 Feet

Pony

54 Feet

80 Feet

Bronco

48 Feet

65 Feet

Little League

46 Feet

50 Feet

Pinto

38 Feet

50 Feet

Softball



Adult slowpitch

50 Feet

65 Feet

College

43 Feet

60 Feet

High School, Adult

40 Feet

60 Feet

Youth 10 and under

35 Feet

55 Feet



Subtle changes in base paths and pitching rubber distances make it difficult to calculate the exact area of the skinned infield, but the numbers expressed in table 3 are generally close. Table 3 also shows the approximately how much baseball dirt (infield mix) is needed to get one inch of coverage for different fields. This number can vary depending on the type of infield mix used. It’s best to order full truck loads of bulk material. A legal full truck is 20 tons (roughly 16 yards).

Table 3

Baseball

Area of Skinned Infield

Dirt needed for 1” of depth

90’ Bases Grass Infield

11,550 Square Feet

36 Yards

90’ Bases Skinned Infield

18,300 Square Feet

57 Yards

80’ Bases Grass Infield

8,400 Square Feet

26 Yards

80’ Bases Skinned Infield

13,650 Square Feet

42 Yards

70’ Bases Grass Infield

6,800 Square Feet

21 Yards

70’ Bases Skinned Infield

10,700 Square Feet

33 Yards

60’ Bases Grass Infield

3,850 Square Feet

12 Yards

60’ Bases Skinned Infield

6,700 Square Feet

21 Yards

Softball



60’ Bases 60’ Arch

8,350 Square Feet

26 Yards

60’ Bases 65’ Arch

9,300 Square Feet

29 Yards



Softball rules are very clear about base paths, and backstop distances. The skinned infield must extend at least 3 feet past the foul line before grass starts and backstops must be a minimum of 25 feet from the back of home plate. Softball umpires will enforce these rules. Baseball is more lenient on these measurements. Base paths are generally suppose to be 6 feet wide (grass infield only), but many coaches prefer a narrower base path because narrow base paths dry faster after a rain. Table 4 shows some recommended back stop positions, and diameters for home plate circles.



Table 4

Baseball

Home Plate to Backstop

Home Plate Circle

Pro, College, High School

60 Feet

26 Feet

Pony

40 Feet

24 Feet

Bronco

30 Feet

22 Feet

Little League

25 Feet

18 Feet

Pinto

20 Feet

20 Feet

Softball

25 Feet Minimum

Varies



On deck circles normally have a 5 foot diameter. Base cutouts are measured from the back corner of the base (closest to the foul line, furthest from home). Table 5 shows cut out radiuses and recommended distances for dugouts from the foul line.

Table 5

Baseball

Base Cut Out Radius

Dugout Distance

Pro, College, High School

13 Feet

15 Feet

Pony

12 Feet

12 Feet

Bronco

11 Feet

9 Feet

Little League

9 Feet

6 Feet

Pinto

9 Feet

6 Feet

Softball

NA

8 Feet



The outfield fence is measured from the back of home plate, but the arc of the fence is not necessarily set from any point on the field. This is why the outfield fence dimensions are hard to establish. Table 6 shows the distance from the back of home plate to center and left field.

Table 6 Home Run Fence Dimension

Baseball

Left Field

Center Field

Pro, College, High School

320-350 Feet

400+ Feet

Pony

250 Feet

300 Feet

Bronco

200 Feet

250 Feet

Little League

175 Feet

225 Feet

Pinto

150 Feet

200 Feet

Softball



Adult slow pitch

265 Feet

315 Feet

College

190 Feet

220 Feet

High School

200 Feet

225 Feet

Adult

200 Feet

250 Feet

Youth 10 and under

150 Feet

175 Feet



Softball uses a 16 foot diameter circle for the pitching area. Baseball uses a pitching mound. A major league mound is 18 feet in diameter and 10 inches higher than home plate. The pitching rubber is installed 18 inches back from the center of this mound. A lot of people don’t realize that the mound is flat on top. The flat area is 5 feet by 34 inches. 6 inches in front of the pitching rubber is flat, and then begins to grade down one inch per foot. Table 7 shows mound diameters and heights.

Table 7 Pitching Mound Dimensions

Baseball

Diameter

Height

Pro, College, High School

18 Feet

10 Inches

Pony

15 Feet

8 Inches

Bronco

12 Feet

6 Inches

Little League

10 Feet

6 Inches

Pinto

9 Feet

4 Inches

 

It is very common for mounds to be built much higher than this. The grade of the field can make the mound area several inches higher than home plate before you start building the actual mound. Umpires rarely enforce rules about pitching mound height unless it is clearly too high.

This is the first draft of this document. Please let me know if I’ve made any mistakes.

Call: Dale Frazier 614-783-5595
Fax: 614-920-0621